Résultats de vente Gerald Gladstone
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Gerald Gladstone
Untitled

58 1/2 x 15 1/2 x 18pouces 148.6 x 39.4 x 45.7cm
circa 1962 - 1965
steel sculpture mounted on laminated wood base

Estimation:    3,000 $ - 4,000 $ CAN
Vendu pour:  2,340 $ CAN (prime d'achat incluse)
lors de la vente aux enchères de la Maison Heffel tenue le 24 septembre 2009
Gerald Gladstone
Untitled

25 x 10 x 10pouces 63.5 x 25.4 x 25.4cm
mixed media sculpture

Estimation:    1,500 $ - 2,000 $ CAN
Vendu pour:  2,250 $ CAN (prime d'achat incluse)
lors de la vente aux enchères de la Maison Heffel tenue le 29 novembre 2014
Gerald Gladstone
Optical Orbital Series #4

16 x 10 x 5pouces 40.6 x 25.4 x 12.7cm
1975
mixed media sculpture

Estimation:    1,000 $ - 1,200 $ CAN
Vendu pour:  2,106 $ CAN (prime d'achat incluse)
lors de la vente aux enchères de la Maison Heffel tenue le 29 mars 2012
Gerald Gladstone
Untitled

58 1/2 x 15 1/2 x 18pouces 148.6 x 39.4 x 45.7cm
circa 1962 - 1965
steel sculpture mounted on laminated wood base

Estimation:    3,000 $ - 4,000 $ CAN
Vendu pour:  1,989 $ CAN (prime d'achat incluse)
lors de la vente aux enchères de la Maison Heffel tenue le 26 juillet 2012
Gerald Gladstone
Untitled

15 x 10 x 10pouces 38.1 x 25.4 x 25.4cm
circa
steel and acrylic resin sculpture

Estimation:    2,000 $ - 3,000 $ CAN
Vendu pour:  1,170 $ CAN (prime d'achat incluse)
lors de la vente aux enchères de la Maison Heffel tenue le 24 septembre 2009
Gerald Gladstone
Untitled

10 x 10 x 10pouces 25.4 x 25.4 x 25.4cm
plexiglass and metal illuminated sculpture

Estimation:    1,200 $ - 1,500 $ CAN
Vendu pour:  936 $ CAN (prime d'achat incluse)
lors de la vente aux enchères de la Maison Heffel tenue le 26 septembre 2013
Gerald Gladstone
Untitled

9 x 8 3/4 x 7 1/8pouces 22.9 x 22.2 x 18.1cm
mixed media sculpture

Estimation:    800 $ - 1,200 $ CAN
Vendu pour:  750 $ CAN (prime d'achat incluse)
lors de la vente aux enchères de la Maison Heffel tenue le 31 mars 2016
Pas d'image disponible

Gerald Gladstone

1929 - 2005
RCA

Gerald Gladstone always resisted definitive explanations for what his art meant. He described his welded metallic sculptures as intuitive representations of the universal order - an expression of his interest in the physics of time and space, in which he sought the link between the intangible infinite of the idea and the empirical dimensions of the object.
Born in Toronto in 1929 to British parents, Gladstone was the sixth of nine children. As a young man he dedicated himself to both painting and music, at one point forming a jazz band in which he played clarinet. In his early twenties he married, and supported his family with various jobs, eventually landing in commercial advertising where he worked for 15 years, rising to become the art director of a leading Toronto agency. Deciding that his passion lay elsewhere, he opened a studio and left the industry to devote himself full time to art. He found recognition among his contemporaries, exhibiting at the Isaacs Gallery alongside Canadian stalwarts Michael Snow and Graham Coughtry. In 1957 he had his first solo exhibition at the Art Gallery of Toronto. In 1959 he won a Canada Council travel grant and relocated his family to London for several years, where he studied at the Royal College of Art. There Gladstone met his mentor, prominent British sculptor Henry Moore, whose sensuous formalism is echoed in Gladstone’s later “earthbound” works like Female Landscape (1972), a public fountain in Montreal’s Place Ville Marie.
Gladstone is best known however for his “spacebound” sculptures of the 1960s - intersecting geometric forms of parabolas, cones and rods - the smaller works sometimes encased in blocks of clear lucite. He found success domestically and internationally through the 1960s and 1970s, having a solo show in New York and receiving numerous public and private commissions. For Expo ’67 in Montreal he constructed Uki, a fire-breathing dragon that rose out of a man-made lake. The Ontario government commissioned Gladstone to construct The Three Graces (1972), a public fountain which sits at Bay and Wellesley streets in Toronto. His largest work at over 21 feet and weighing some 6,000 pounds, the bronze colossus Universal Man (1976) was commissioned for the CN Tower, where it was displayed for over a decade before being relocated to the Yorkdale Shopping Centre. His international work includes a public fountain in Canberra, Australia and a memorial to Martin Luther King Jr. in Los Angeles. The Art Gallery of Ontario held a retrospective of his work in 2003.

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